*I'm just a soul whose intentions are good, Oh Lord! please don't let me be misunderstood*

Tag Archives: spirit


Part One

Part Two

Part Three

Part Four

The above shows that whatever comes out of a man/woman  defiles him/her.


Matthew 15:18 – “However, things proceeding out of the mouth

come out of the heart, and those things defile a man/woman.”


We, at all times, should be clothed with right attitudes and gracious speech.

A thoughtless word, untimely spoken, drives ripples of hated, anger and

bitterness and it can never be taken back.  Unfortunately mouthing a zillions

of  “I’m sorry” might not mend the tightest of bonds as the respect and trust

and love has been somewhat violated.  Words uttered can never be retrieved

to be buried anywhere, though being forgiven for the thoughtlessness of it.

Henceforth, we should always ‘think before we speak’ as in Proverbs 15:4,

King Solomon quotes that “The calmness of the tongue is a tree of life, but

the distortion in it means a breaking down in the spirit”.


*keziah boey*




*The Sultan and Satan*

An ancient legend from the East tells of a great sultan who was a devout man of God. One morning he overslept. When the Devil saw that the hour of morning prayer was passing, he woke the sultan and urged him to get out of bed and pray.

Sultan from the East

Sultan from the East

“Who are you?” asked the startled sultan, still rubbing the sleep from his eyes.

“Oh, it’s not important,” replied the shady figure. “The important thing is that I woke you up in time, otherwise you would have missed your prayers for the first time in ten years-and it is very good to pray, isn’t it?”

“Yes, that is true!” replied the sultan smugly. “I wouldn’t dream of missing my prayer time. Not even once! … But wait a minute! I think I recognize you. Yes, I know your face. Of course! You are Satan, and no doubt you have some evil motive for your appearance!”

Satan aka The Devil and Deceiver

Satan aka The Devil and Deceiver

“I’m not really as bad as you think!” exclaimed the intruder. “After all, I was God’s right-hand angel once.”

“That is all very well,” replied the wise old sultan, “but you are also the Deceiver; that is your business! So I demand in the name of God to know why you want me to get up and pray!”

“Well,” replied the Devil, having grown huffy and impatient with the sultan’s persistence, “if you must know, I’ll tell you. If you had slept and forgotten your prayers, you would have felt very sorry for it afterward and would have been quite penitent. That would have humbled you and brought you close to God. But if you continue on as you have for the last ten years, without missing a single prayer, then you will become so satisfied with yourself that it will be worse for you than if you had missed one prayer and had asked God for forgiveness. God loves your fault mixed with repentance much more than your virtue seasoned with pride!”

Often it is actually good for us to make some mistakes because if we didn’t, we’d most likely become so proud of ourselves and so self-confident that we’d no longer feel we needed any help from God or others. But in reality, when we feel so proud and self-satisfied, it’s because we’re not closer to God, but more full of ourselves.

Many people in the world today are taught that pride is a virtue. But God recognizes pride and self-righteousness for what they really are-sins of the heart! The Bible says that “pride goes before destruction, and a haughty spirit before a fall,” and that “God resists the proud, but gives grace to the humble” (Proverbs 16:18; James 4:6).

Quite frequently God uses our mistakes to help keep our pride in check, to keep us humble and more dependent on His goodness and strength, rather than our own. The Lord blesses humility. He gives more grace to the humble, and promises to dwell “with him who has a contrite and humble spirit” (1 Peter 5:5; Isaiah 57:15).

It has been said that out of what seems like defeat come some of God’s greatest victories. “But what kind of victory is that?” you may ask. Well, God very often uses humbling experiences to make us better people-more compassionate and understanding of the errors of others, more loving and patient, when otherwise we might not have been so. The Lord wants to use our mistakes to teach us many important lessons that perhaps we wouldn’t be able to learn any other way. So isn’t it encouraging to realize that even our failures can be for our good?

Of course, in order for the Lord to bring this good to pass, we must be honest with ourselves, be willing to confess our mistakes, and attempt to rectify them. The hardest words to say in any language are, “I was wrong!” This takes humility of the kind that only God can give, because it’s human nature to want to appear perfect and faultless, and consequently be unable to confess our mistakes.

But if we want the truth and desire God’s blessing, then we’ll honestly and humbly admit our faults and failings. Then we can take comfort in knowing that we are wiser today than we were yesterday. Contrary to what some folks seem to think, an admission of error is a sign of strength rather than weakness.

Besides, God knows you’re anything but perfect. In fact, He knows you can’t be perfect and never will be. So the crux of the matter is not whether you are perfect or not, but whether you depend on the Lord and His grace, love and mercy. Do you give Him all the glory and credit for anything good that you do? Whenever you accomplish something good, you should say, “Just thank Jesus. Don’t thank me! If I have done anything good, it’s only because the Lord helped me do so.”

A good rule to follow is this: Give God all the glory for anything good you do, and yourself the blame for anything bad. That will help keep you from falling into that horrible trap of self-righteous pride, which is the basis of virtually all sin.

So whenever you make a mistake and are then tempted to get down and discouraged, just remember the sultan’s lesson: God loves your fault mixed with repentance more than your virtue seasoned with pride!



Ω α

the monastery in the high mountains

the monastery in the high mountains

Ω α

High in the mountains was a monastery that had once been

known throughout the world. 

Its monks were pious, its students were enthusiastic.

The chants from the monastery’s chapel deeply touched

the hearts of people who came there to pray and meditate.

But, something had changed.

Fewer and fewer young men came to study there;

fewer and fewer people came for spiritual nourishment.

The monks who remained became disheartened and sad.

Deeply worried, the abbot of the monastery went off in search of an answer.

Why had his monastery fallen on such hard times?

The abbot came to a guru, and he asked the master,

“Is it because of some sin of ours that the monastery is no longer full of vitality?”

“Yes,” replied the master, “it is the sin of ignorance.”

“The sin of ignorance?” questioned the abbot.

“Of what are we ignorant?”

The guru looked at the abbot for a long, long time, and then he said,  

“One of you is the messiah in disguise.

But, you are all ignorant of this.”

Then, the guru closed his eyes, and he was silent.

“The messiah?” thought the abbot. “

The messiah is one of us?

Who could it be?

Could it be Brother Cook?

Could it be Brother Treasurer?

Could it be Brother Bell-Ringer?

Could it be Brother Vegetable Grower?

“Which one? Which one?

Every one of us has faults, failings, human defects.

Isn’t the messiah supposed to be perfect?

But, then, perhaps these faults and failings are part of his disguise.

Which one? Which one?”

When the abbot returned to the monastery, he gathered all the monks

together and told them what the guru had said.  

“One of us?

The messiah?

Impossible!”

But, the master had spoken, and the master was never wrong.

“One of us?

The messiah?  

Incredible!

But, it must be so.

Which one? Which one?

That brother over there?

That one? That one?”

Whichever one of the monks was the messiah,

he was, surely, in disguise.

Not knowing who amongst them was the messiah,

all the monks began treating each other with new respect.

“You never know,” they thought, “ he might be the one,

so I had better deal with him kindly.”

Do unto others as you would have them do unto you
Do unto others as you would have them do unto you

It was not long before the monastery was filled with new found joy.

Soon, new students came to learn, and people came

from far and wide to be inspired

by the chants of the kind, smiling monks.

For once again, the monastery was filled with the spirit of love.


Moral : The world would be a beautiful and much better

place if all of humanity would treat each other kindly and

respectfully without hypocrisy and giving of each other with

the spirit of love without any judgment.



Life's Journey

Life's an Intriguing Journey

Life is an uphill battle, also an intriguing journey
a sojourner on fascinating trails of soul’s tourney

Life is a repertoire of good and bad, wins and losses
no matter the circumstances humans prevails the tosses

Life is not a lavish road of personal selfish indulgence
but kindly loving acts to each and everyone in accordance

Life is questing and thirsting serendipitous surprises
all defining golden moments that one covets as prizes

Life is a series of devastating trials and tribulations
that toughens the spirit, assurance of transformations

LIFE ... Appreciate The Journey

LIFE ... Appreciate The Journey

Life is a medley of loves, some unrequited some great
which all human hearts are buoyed with destined fate

Life is much drama sporadic times of ease and leisure
some events better forgotten other moments to treasure

Life is where we feel heights of joy and depths of sorrow
where it alters our attitudes and perspectives for tomorrow

Life is like a river, meandering stream or a gushing rapid
accept whatever destiny brings, the zest together the vapid

Life is the ultimate heartbeat and pulse of every soul
stay true to yourself and to God and you’ll feel whole

Ω

© Keziah Boey August 2007

Ω

This poem may not be reproduced on any website or other medium without consent.
If you wish to use this poem, please request permission first.



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